Bob Rigby

Those shades of blue by Jana Uyeda

I finally got organized enough to send a box of Kodak Ektar 4x5 sheets to Citizen's Photo in Portland and was rewarded with a very quick turnaround and some lovely new images. Here is one of the first scans I made of the blue, blue skies at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge just south of Seattle. I timed my visit so I could experience the walkways during high tide and the trip did not disappoint. The entire area was covered in 12-13 inches of water, amazing. We're so lucky in the PNW to have both the mountains and the sea to provide us with these sights.

Blue skies over Nisqually

Success! IR Pinhole Improvement by Jana Uyeda

bob rigby_110-edit

Barn at Nisqually Wildlife RefugeIf you've been following my blog then you've probably wondered - where the heck did she go?

Apologies. I'm doing my best to get back on track. Here's an IR pinhole sheet from my trip to the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge a few weeks ago. My first few sheets were awful and plagued with sun flares. This is much better.

Mahalo!

Quick post: Through the Hoh Rainforest with IR film by Jana Uyeda

I just returned from a wonderful long weekend spent in Olympic National Park. Specifically, in the Hoh Rainforest, walking through the Hall of Mosses and following the Hoh River. I have several rolls for Panda Labs to develop and at least 15 sheets of 4x5 Ektar to be sent to Citizen's Photo in Portland. Here are the first few sheets which I developed tonight and a video I captured while walking through the forest. It was a very successful, productive and relaxing trip.

How was your Memorial Day weekend?

Hoh River

Hoh tree

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5_bsDUpc8o&w=420&h=315]

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day - Onboard the Arthur Foss by Jana Uyeda

On April 28, 2013 some pinhole friends and I got together to celebrate Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, a global event that continues to grow year over year. I can personally attest to the surprising growth of pinhole photography in my corner of the world in Seattle. Last year for WPPD 2012 I met with the only two local pinhole photographers that I knew of and we took some pictures around the Ballard Locks. I didn't have a pinhole camera yet so I used my Diana F+ with that janky long exposure rig. It was an awful setup, but sufficient for the day. This year, there were six of us and most had at least 2 or more pinhole cameras. It's funny how each camera has it's unique quirks so that one pinhole camera is not enough. Great to see other photographers picking up the pinhole camera and embracing its aesthetics.

For WPPD 2013 we started at Olympic Sculpture Park, strolled around for a bit, found some beer then headed for Lake Union Park. At the Northwest Seaport Maritime Heritage Center we climbed on board the Arthur Foss, a wooden-hulled tugboat famous for appearing in the 1933 MGM movie Tugboat Annie. What made the trip even more special was a guide on the vessel who was an avid pinhole photographer! I was greeted with, "Hello, I like your pinhole camera!" as I approached the tugboat.

The boat was still covered in white tarp but I was allowed to walk freely through the cabins, the sleeping quarters, the deck and the galley with my tripod and pinhole cameras. Here are some 4x5's from the trip. Enjoy!

Wheel

arthur foss_deck

The Arthur Foss

arthur foss_galley

Update: Some infrared 4x5 improvements by Jana Uyeda

After my first attempt at 4x5 infrared pinhole shots I made a few changes. I removed then re-glued the filter mount in the camera, making sure to keep the glue on the outside of the filter so it laid flat against the wood. The glue was causing some issues with light leaks and strange light reflections so I was hoping to eliminate these. When the camera was ready, I headed out to expose a few sheets of film. I looked for bright, sunny 16 conditions before setting up the tripod and taking the shot. Then I made sure to reverse my dark slides on the film holders after exposing a frame to prevent unintentional double exposures. When I came home to develop the sheets I made sure to stand develop only two sheets at a time. I saw some nice improvements.

Seattle IR cityscape

arboretum sakura

I was getting the white trees and dark skies that I wanted but there was some odd light flare on the bottom right of each frame and it was consistent across the four sheets I exposed. I used some black gaffer's tape and taped up the edge inside the filter mount where the metal and glass connected. The glue was also covered.

I went out on the last sunny afternoon we've had in the PNW and exposed another two sheets of IR. I think I may finally have the camera properly setup for infrared film. Now it's just a matter of sunshine, not an easy thing when I live in Seattle.

third attempt - IR trees

I'll be sure to update the blog once the sunny weather returns. How are your experiments coming along? Got any plans for Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day?